How to Find a Job

How to Find a Job

Frequently Asked Questions about How to Job Search

  • What are the common methods of job hunting?
  • What are the basics of an effective job search?
  • How can social media and new technologies help my job search?
  • Should I consider Self-employment?
  • What is Freelancing?
  • Are job-seeking expenses allowed as Tax Deductions?
  • How long does it take to find a new job?
  • How do I find a new job while employed?
  • How to get a new job with no experience?
  • How do I start looking for a new job?
  • Finding a new job at over 50 years old?
  • Where is the best place to apply for jobs?
  • When should I start applying for jobs?
  • What should you not do when applying for a job?
  • What should I wear to apply for a job?
  • How do I write a resume or CV for a job?
  • How do you start an email applying for a job?
  • What is the format of a job application?
  • How can social media help your job search?
  • What role does social media play in searching for a job today?
  • What jobs should you not post on social media?
  • How do I network for job search?
  • Where can I find companies to apply for jobs?
  • What do you write in an email when applying for a job?
  • What are the jobs of the future?

“The average person puts only 25% of his energy into his work. The world takes off its hat to those who put in more than 50% of their capacity, and stands on its head for those few and far between souls who devote 100%.”

– Andrew Carnegie

Searching for a New Job

Job hunting or job searching is the act of looking for employment, due to unemployment, underemployment, discontent with a current position, or the desire for a better position or better benefits.

The immediate goal of searching for a new job is to obtain a job interview with an employer which may lead to getting hired. The job seeker typically first looks for job vacancies or employment opportunities.

What are the common methods of Job Hunting?

  • Finding a job through friends
  • Find a job through your business or educational network
  • Find a job through personal networking at industry events, conferences
  • Find a job through social media, such as LinkedIn
  • Using an employment website
  • Job listing search engines
  • Looking through the classifieds in newspapers
  • Using an employment agency or recruiter
  • Looking on a company’s web site for open jobs
  • Attending job fairs
  • Using professional guidance such as outplacement services that give training in writing a résumé, applying for jobs and how to be successful at interview.
  • Visiting target organization to find contact information and to determine whether it is recruiting new staff.

What are the basics of an effective Job Search?

  • Take a Personal Inventory
    • Review the skills and experience you can bring to a new role?
    • What “hard” skills, such as technical or industry knowledge can you bring to a new employer?
    • What “soft” skills, such as communication, management, or leadership can you being a new employer?
  • Identify the Keywords for Your New Role Search
    • Research new roles that can take your career to a new level or a new direction?
    • Determine what job descriptions and associated titles interest you?
    • Draw a Venn diagram with skills in one circle, knowledge in another circle, and new job opportunities in the final circle. The intersection of skills, experience, and new job opportunities is your sweet spot for exploring a new job based on personal inventory assessment.
    • Determine the keywords used in job descriptions and titles that you can use to conduct further research in your job search.
How to Find a Job
  • Update all Networking Sites
    • Update your profile on LinkedIn and other relevant networking sites
    • Add the new skills and knowledge you identified in your personal inventory review.
    • Embed into your on-line profiles the keywords for your new job search.
  • Identify new Job Opportunities
    • Use the common methods of Job Hunting outlined above to find new jobs that fit the keywords you have selected.
    • Use online job advertising services that allow you to set up an automatic search agent. This service will send you email alerts when new jobs are posted that fit your specified keywords.
  • Update your resume or CV
    • Update your reference resume or CV with your newly acquires skills, knowledge, and experience.
    • Use the information and insights provided at our Resume FAQs page.
    • When applying for a specific job, you will need to edit your resume to match the employer’s terminology and to highlight the relevant knowledge, and skills.
  • Write a Cover Letter
    • Create a reference cover letter that can serve as a template for each customized cover letter you will send to employers.
    • Your reference cover letter, list your most relevant skills or experiences for the new role you are seeking.
    • When you apply for a specific job, you will need to edit the cover letter to match the employer’s terminology and to highlight the knowledge, and skills from the job description.
  • References
    • References do not need to be included in the resume or CV, but you should have them ready for the Job Interview stage.
    • You should seek out at least three references. In most cases, they are not written references. They are people who will take a phone call to confirm the details in your resume.
    • Ensure your references are willing to offer positive feedback.
    • Confirm contact details.
    • Provide updated resumes and CVs to all your references.
    • A LinkedIn recommendation from your references would be beneficial. A LinkedIn recommendation is also a good test of what your references are likely to say to a recruiter.
  • Apply Early and Often
    • Make as many job applications as you can comfortably manage.
    • Apply for relevant jobs even if the specific opportunity is not ideal. The opportunity to interview will allow you to practice and refine your interview skills.
    • Not every job application will result in a job interview.
    • Not every job interview will result in a job offer.
    • The more applications you make and learn from, the more successful you will become in your job search.
  • Stay Positive
    • Looking for a new job can become frustrating and demoralizing. It is not easy.
    • Use effective stress management techniques.
    • Share your experiences with someone who can provide a positive and motivating feedback loop.
    • Read great books.

“The results you achieve will be in direct proportion to the effort you apply.”

– Dennis Waitley

How can social media help my job search?

Most employers and recruitment agencies use social media to promote new jobs. They do this for cost reasons and efficiency. They also use social media to search for candidates for roles that they will not advertise. Some roles do not get advertised because they may be confidentiality or sensitivity issues in making a public declaration about hiring intentions.

Similarly, social networks have become an essential forum for candidates to promote their skills. Social media allows candidates to establish a brand, network, and identify job opportunities. Social networks effectively place a candidate’s skills and experience into the public domain.

How to use LinkedIn in your Job Search

LinkedIn is a business and employment-oriented platform that operates via websites and mobile apps. It is mainly used for professional networking, including employers posting jobs and job seekers posting their resumes and CVs.

A significant amount of the company’s revenue came from selling access to information about its members to recruiters and sales professionals. LinkedIn has over 630 million registered members in 200 countries. LinkedIn allows employees, self-employed, and employers to create profiles and “connections” to each other.

Job recruiters, head hunters, and HR departments are increasingly using LinkedIn as a source for finding potential candidates. By using the search tools, recruiters can find members matching their exact keywords.

They can also directly contact members by sending a request to connect or by InMail. Recruiters can also join industry based LinkedIn groups to create connections with professionals in their target industries or business.

“Fall seven times, stand up eight.”

– Japanese proverb

Job Listings on LinkedIn

LinkedIn allows users to search and research organizations that they may be interested in targeting for a job search. LinkedIn data and features include:

  • The location of the company’s headquarters and other offices.
  • Details about the Company in the About Tab
  • Links to a list of present and former employees.
  • Links to employment statistics such as the ratio of female to male employees.
  • Links to the most common titles or positions held.
  • Links to stock price and latest financial details.
  • Product or service advertising.
  • Job Listing with a keyword search for large companies.
  • Features that allowed potential employees to automatically apply for positions using their LinkedIn profiles as resumes.

How to use LinkedIn to find a job?

  • Build your LinkedIn network today, before you need it because one day, you might need it.
  • Ensure your profile is complete and up-to-date and use all the profile and portfolio features available.
  • Make sure your profile picture is professional.
  • Make sure all your contributions are professional.
  • Seek LinkedIn recommendations and endorsements before you need them in a job search.
  • Turn your profile into a portfolio showcase of your achievements in projects, publications, and awards.
  • Make sure that you know what is public and what is private on any social media platform.
  • Get involved in LinkedIn Professional Groups.
  • Follow relevant companies and individuals in your industry or network.
  • During a job search research your potential future boss and executive team.
  • Keep your personal networking and professional networking on separate accounts or different social media platforms.

“An obstacle may be either a stepping stone or a stumbling block.”

Job-seeking Tax Deductions

Generally, expenses related to the “carrying-on of a business or trade” are deductible from a taxpayer’s income. For many taxpayers, this means that some expenses related to seeking new employment can be deducted, resulting in tax savings, as long as certain criteria are met.

You should consult your local tax department guidelines and also seek professional Tax advice to explore which of the following Job-seeking expenses you can claim as a Tax Deduction:

  • Continuous education
  • Memberships to industry and professional associations
  • Resume or CV writing consulting services

Caution: A taxpayer may only be able to deduct the costs associated with seeking new employment when searching for a new employer in the same profession. Some Tax authorities insisted on a high degree of consistency between the new position sought and the previous means of employment to meet the criteria of “carrying-on of a business or trade”. This means that if substantial differences exist between the taxpayer’s prior job and those of the job he now seeks, then the expenses incurred will be deemed to be start-up costs, and treated differently.

Should I consider Self-Employment?

Self-employed people generally find their own work rather than being provided with work by an employer, earning income from a trade or business that they operate. Research has shown that levels of self-employment in the United States and other first-world economies are increasing.

Self-employment will be covered in future installments.

What is Freelancing?

Freelancing (sometimes spelled free-lance) refers to a person with specific marketable and in-demand skills who is self-employed and is not committed to a particular employer long-term. Freelance workers are sometimes represented by an agency that resells freelance services to clients. Others work independently or use professional associations or websites to get work.

Professions, and industries where freelancing is common include: music, art, writing, acting, computer programming, web design, graphic design, translating and film production

“Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.”

– Thomas Edison

How to Find a Job – FAQs – to be covered with our Next Instalment

  • How long does it take to find a new job?
  • How do I find a new job while employed?
  • How to get a new job with no experience?
  • How do I start looking for a new job?
  • Finding a new job at over 50 years old?
  • Where is the best place to apply for jobs?
  • When should I start applying for jobs?
  • What should you not do when applying for a job?
  • What should I wear to apply for a job?
  • How do I write a resume or CV for a job?
  • How do you start an email applying for a job?
  • What is the format of a job application?
  • How can social media help your job search?
  • What role does social media play in searching for a job today?
  • What jobs should you not post on social media?
  • How Hashtags Can Help Your Job Search?
  • How do I network for job search?
  • Where can I find companies to apply for jobs?
  • What do you write in an email when applying for a job?
  • What are the jobs of the future?

“If the wind will not serve, take to the oars.”

– Latin Proverb

Are these Coaching Tips on “How to Find a Job” useful?

Explore the Coaching Information from some of the world’s top experts. Click the links below:

Books About Job Interviews

  • Finding a Job in the 21st Century | How to Find a Job Without Losing Yer Frickin’ Mind, by Benjamin Paul, 2014
  • The Art of Finding the Job You Love: An Unconventional Guide to Work with Meaning, by Cara Heilmann, 2017
  • 50 Ways to Get a Job: An Unconventional Guide to Finding Work on Your Terms, by Dev Aujla and Lodro Rinzler, 2018
  • Finding a Job After 50 MP3 CD – Audiobook, by Jeanette Woodward and Fran Tunno, 2016
  • The Harvard Business School Guide to Finding Your Next Job, by Robert S. Gardella, 2000
  • What Color Is Your Parachute? Job-Hunter’s Workbook, Fifth Edition: A Companion to the Best-selling Job-Hunting Book in the World, by Richard N. Bolles, 2018
  • The 2-Hour Job Search: Using Technology to Get the Right Job Faster Paperback, by Steve Dalton, 2012
  • Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type Paperback, by Paul D. Tieger, 2014
  • Knock ’em Dead: The Ultimate Job Search Guide, by Yate CPC, Martin, 2014
  • How to Find Fulfilling Work (The School of Life), by Roman Krznaric, 2013
  • The 20-Minute Networking Meeting – Executive Edition: Learn to Network. Get a Job by Marcia Ballinger and Nathan A. Perez, 2012
  • 100 Conversations for Career Success: Learn to Network, Cold Call, and Tweet Your Way to Your Dream Job Paperback, by Laura M. Labovich, Miriam Salpeter, 2012
  • Life Reimagined: Discovering Your New Life Possibilities Paperback, by Richard J. Leider, Alan M. Webber, 2013
  • The Leap: Launching Your Full-Time Career in Our Part-Time Economy, by Robert Dickie, 2015
  • A Foot in the Door: Networking Your Way Into the Hidden Job Market, by Katharine Hansen, 2013

“However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at.”

– Stephen Hawking

Photo Credits:Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay illustrations/word-cloud-recruitment-process-1758159/ ; Ring0 [Public domain]